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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology

Welcome

Welcome to the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology (EEOB) at Iowa State University.

EEOB has many active research programs and opportunities for student interest in conservation biology, ecological and evolutionary genomics, population, community, and ecosystem ecology, quantitative genetics, and other traditional organismal disciplines such as taxonomy. 

Faculty in EEOB are linked through students and research programs to many other departments within the life sciences, as well as to supporting disciplines in the physical and computational sciences.  The diverse knowledge of the EEOB faculty provides unique opportunities for undergraduate students majoring in Biology, Genetics, and Environmental Science, to whom we offer a rich and cutting-edge curriculum.

If you have any questions about programs or opportunities in EEOB, please contact us at 515-294-0133.  We look forward to serving you.

 

Bessey green house home to hundreds of exotic plants

 

Pressing the button with the letter ‘R,’ in the elevator in Bessey Hall will take passengers to the roof, where they can escape to a tropical rain forest of sorts. It is home to banana plants, cacao trees and coffea plants.

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Graduate Student Spotlight

Graduate student receives GLEON fellowship

 

 

PhD candidate Ana (Mindy) Morales was recently awarded a graduate fellowship from the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON). The GLEON Graduate Fellows Program, funded by the NSF Macrosystems Biology Program, trains graduate fellows in technical, conceptual, and analytical skills critical to carry out macrosytem biology and network science. Mindy was chosen to participate in this program based on her dissertation work in algal phenology and carbon cycling using high frequency sensor monitoring.

Recent Graduate Student Spotlights

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

News & Updates

Tyranny of trees in grassy biomes

Joseph Veldman and collegues explore the effects of restoration strategies in grassy biomes in Science.

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EEOB alum presented with diversity award

Jeramie Strickland, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has been selected as the 2014 recipient of the Wildlife Society Diversity Award, recognizing hisefforts towards furthering diversity in employment, academic enrollment, or membership.

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Hufford et al. published in Nature Plants

Faculty member, Matthew Hufford and collegues research on the origin and evolution of maize in the Southwestern Unites States was recently published in Nature Plants.

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Serb discusses the disco clam on Live Science

Faculty member, Jeanne Serb discusses recent research into the flashy defense mechanism of the disco clam, Ctenoides ales.

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Pleasants noted in NY Times article on monarch butterflies

The number of migrating monarch butterflies has dropped more than 90 percent in 20 years, htting a record low in Mexico last year.

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EEOB graduate assesses the impact of wind turbines on bat poplutions

Dr. Dawn Reding, former EOBB graduate student, is working with Luther College students to survey bat populations and estimate bat mortality caused by the rotor blades.

Full Article

EEOB alum featured in Stories

Dr. Lex Flagel, PhD genetics graduate with Dr. Jonathan Wendel, was recenty feature in the July edition of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences' Stories.

Full Article

EEOB faculty member teams with collegues to contribute to Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B

The upcoming August isse of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B honors Dr. Leslie D. Gottlieb's contributions to plant evolutionary biology. Dr. Jonathan Wendel, EEOB chair, assisted in the compilation and editing of the issue.

See the issue

Graduate Student paper accepted by Molecular Biology and Evolution

A paper entitled "Cytonuclear evoltion of rubisco in four allopolyploid lineages" was recently accepted by the journal, Molecular Biology and Evolution. Written by EEOB Ph.D. Candidate, Lei Gong, the paper examines the investigation of cytonuclear coordintion for the key chlorplast protein rubisco.

Treated corn seeds may impact honeybee populations

EEOB facutly member, Amy Toth, speaks with Iowa Public Radio about the impact corn dust may play in the collapse of the nation's honeybee populations.

Listen

 


Seminar Series:

March 12, 2015
David Queller, Washington University in St. Louis